Start with Your Customers' View in Every Strategy

Start with Your Customers' View in Every Strategy

Customer experience is defined entirely by customers, but the solution provider defines customer experience management (CEM). The customer is the judge of whether the experience was acceptable or stellar, or not; the customer defines the duration of their experience, as well as the context and the criteria. Therefore, CEM seeks to understand the gap between desired and current experience as seen from the customer's viewpoint (not just the competitive performance gap, per se). Then CEM solves the gap holistically and anticipates the evolving needs of the customer to prevent future gaps.

Customer experience is defined entirely by customers, but the solution provider defines customer experience management (CEM). The customer is the judge of whether the experience was acceptable or stellar, or not; the customer defines the duration of their experience, as well as the context and the criteria. Therefore, CEM seeks to understand the gap between desired and current experience as seen from the customer's viewpoint (not just the competitive performance gap, per se). Then CEM solves the gap holistically and anticipates the evolving needs of the customer to prevent future gaps.

Mis-Matched Priorities
Ironically, most strategic planning templates, consultants' models, and business and marketing textbooks begin with other topics and address serving a customer need much later in their prescription for success. While I strongly admire and advocate these organizations' thought leadership, I beg to differ with their starting point for customer experience success.

First Things First
Why not start with the customer? What do they want? What is their reality? Some managers reply that the customer doesn't really know; they're not expert in the sophisticated product or service they buy. Some managers point out that what customers say they want and what they actually buy are often two different things. Other managers admit that they never thought about that because they assumed the purpose of a business is to create profit, and therefore, customers should automatically appreciate the offering or perhaps customers must be educated on why the organization's offering is desirable and superior. All of these hesitations to listen intently to customers can be overcome with the right approach to CEM.

I'm reminded of cake recipes that advocate mixing the dry ingredients first; while the end-product is edible when this advice is not followed, it's less likely to win first prize at the county fair. Likewise, businesses that start with understanding the customer, rather than the other way around, become well rewarded financially for superior customer-centricity.

Paradigm Shift
Some organizations do place voice of the customer as the starting point for their innovations, business processes, management attention, and resource allocation. 

Think differently!  This approach has been adopted for product innovations such as the Bosch CS20 circular saw, Motorola radios installed in vehicles, J.R. Simplot french fries, Pratt & Whitney jet engines, and many others. Ethnography, or observation research, is particularly useful in gaining a pure understanding of the customer's world. Metaphors are also very useful for expanding your organization's customer centricity. It's time for customer experience management community to adopt the thinking that the innovation community has espoused for the past decade.